I have read that veges need lime. I have never limed my vege patch before but do get variable results...my patch gets composted chicken manure and composted everything else as well as a seaweed drink/foliar spray when I remember. So should I lime? And is it beneficial for all veges or just some? Also when should I do it? and can I plant straight into it or does it need to be left for a while?? cheers, Denise

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The best thing I did was to get a soil test kit. It cost $25.00 but it has the capacity for 25 tests. Brassicas need lime, so do legumes. Carrots are not fussy and strawberries don't like it. But how much to put on is what the kit will tell you. You are looking for a Ph level in the green .. I think it's about 4- 8 but I'd have to look it up. Someone else will know for sure.
Do it now though earlier would be better. It takes about 10 weeks to really kick in. Sprinkle it on top rather than dig it in. You can plant in it now. Have fun!
brilliant, thanks. I will do just that. Hopefully it will improve yields this summer!

Robyn Wolfe said:
The best thing I did was to get a soil test kit. It cost $25.00 but it has the capacity for 25 tests. Brassicas need lime, so do legumes. Carrots are not fussy and strawberries don't like it. But how much to put on is what the kit will tell you. You are looking for a Ph level in the green .. I think it's about 4- 8 but I'd have to look it up. Someone else will know for sure.
Do it now though earlier would be better. It takes about 10 weeks to really kick in. Sprinkle it on top rather than dig it in. You can plant in it now. Have fun!
Hi Luvly Denise,
Have checked the Yates book and ... Most vegetables and herbs grow successfully in soil that is slightly acid (pH 6.0-7.0).
A good time to apply lime is after summer crops have finished and before cool-season crops have established. Only needs to be added to vegetable beds every year or two, too much can be harmful. All the signs look good for a bumper season, 'specially stone fruit, sooo many blossoms this spring.
Take care...it's a jungle out there!
hey there luvly Jude! Thank you, the big question is then, do I lime now or not???

and yes, so much blossom! Am going to buy pheromone traps this weekend too and set up a watering system off the tank... busy busy!

Just quietly I think my apricot has set fruit... we had a whole 1 off it last year after a moderate blossoming but this year, well, I dont want to tempt fate but....watch this space! :)

Jude Simpson said:
Hi Luvly Denise,
Have checked the Yates book and ... Most vegetables and herbs grow successfully in soil that is slightly acid (pH 6.0-7.0).
A good time to apply lime is after summer crops have finished and before cool-season crops have established. Only needs to be added to vegetable beds every year or two, too much can be harmful. All the signs look good for a bumper season, 'specially stone fruit, sooo many blossoms this spring.
Take care...it's a jungle out there!
Denise,

Most of our common veges grow best (have all nutrients available) at a pH between 6 and 8. Our soils are usually quite acid here (below pH of 6), and so lime helps rectify this situation in the soil. I agree a soil test kit is a good tool. It is pretty hard to put too much lime on, as it takes years to break down in the soil and start affecting the acidity, so best to put some on each year and test as well. Don't use dolomite lime, it is very slow acting. Many farmers put on 3 or 4 tonnes per acre or more to keep grass growing. Best to work deeply in the soil, anytime is fine.

Cheers and have fun

Michael
Thanks Michael (and everyone), I just love having this expertise at my fingertips!

is there a best kind of lime?? (the questions keep coming! - must be because I am a researcher :) )...like one that is 'greener' than others - I have no idea what that might mean but you know trying for the smaller, softer footprint all the time :)

Michael Hogan said:
Denise,

Most of our common veges grow best (have all nutrients available) at a pH between 6 and 8. Our soils are usually quite acid here (below pH of 6), and so lime helps rectify this situation in the soil. I agree a soil test kit is a good tool. It is pretty hard to put too much lime on, as it takes years to break down in the soil and start affecting the acidity, so best to put some on each year and test as well. Don't use dolomite lime, it is very slow acting. Many farmers put on 3 or 4 tonnes per acre or more to keep grass growing. Best to work deeply in the soil, anytime is fine.

Cheers and have fun

Michael
I haven't any personal experience of this as yet, but recently went to a workshop held by Kay Baxter and Bob Corker on growing nutrient dense food. Kay recommended a lime product by Environmental Ferilisers as being the quickest way of adjusting the PH of your garden. She also said not to use a certain type of lime..Dolomite lime I think it was, because this puts the magnesium/calcium ratio out which is apparently not good.

Denise said:
Thanks Michael (and everyone), I just love having this expertise at my fingertips!
is there a best kind of lime?? (the questions keep coming! - must be because I am a researcher :) )...like one that is 'greener' than others - I have no idea what that might mean but you know trying for the smaller, softer footprint all the time :)
brilliant, thanks!

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