Hi everyone, I am keen on increasing the amount of raw food that I eat. So far, I am making grated salads with combinations of some or one of swede, carrot, beetroot, cauliflower or cabbage. I then pour over a dressing I make. Any food combinations and recipes would be extremely helpful. To make it a little difficult I can only eat the veges I grow as you can rarely buy organic veges or fruit in the small town where I live.
Thank you for your attention.
Katherine

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Hi Katherine :)

My own diet has constantly evolved as I have learned more about health, and subsequently so has my recipe book. I have found that you can make salads out of practically anything, and you can find out what you like / dislike through trying it out. Generally speaking, I think that the more you have in a salad the nicer it gets. A sure fire winning salad dressing is 1/2 cider vinegar, 1/3 tamari sauce and then toasted sesame oil to taste.

I now generally use avocado, orange juice and garlic blended up as my dressing.
Thank you Glen. I shall use both of your dressing recipes.
By the way I did hear on the radio the other day that red and orange vegetables need to be accompanied with a fat to help the body extract the nutrients from them. Also read ages ago that the lypcene (I don't think I have the word correct) in tomatoes is best available if the tomato is cooked.
I have found that there is a vast learning curve when it comes to nutrition, and a lifestyle which provides optimal wellness. Generally I take most recommendations ( even those of the professionals ) with a grain of salt. Research all you can and keep an open mind I reckon. The concept of cooking the tomatoes for extra benifit, sounds to me like another half cocked conclusion based on very specific, exclusive data.

Something that I am getting into in a big way now days is sprouting. I grow wheatgrass, pea greens, lentil greens, buckwheat greens, and mung, lentil and a bunch of other sprouts for eating whole. I find the greens to be a yummy, nutritious and cheap home grown vege to bulk up any salad with.
Katherine Lucas said:
Thank you Glen. I shall use both of your dressing recipes.
By the way I did hear on the radio the other day that red and orange vegetables need to be accompanied with a fat to help the body extract the nutrients from them. Also read ages ago that the lypcene (I don't think I have the word correct) in tomatoes is best available if the tomato is cooked.

Lycopene itself may (MAY) be more bioavailable when a tomato is cooked, but many thousands of other important nutrients that the tomato also contains are definately less bioavailable when it's cooked! Vitamins B & C, and many many other little-known but very-beneficial phytonutrients, are destroyed by heat, This is one of the important things that Ive learned during my past 10 years of research and living a raw food "diet" (lifestyle).
Hi Glen and Steven, thank you for your reply. I love the idea of eating sprouts. I grew buckwheat last year, for palatability I think I will have to unhull it before I sprout it. Very interesting. I am very keen to get as much goodness out of my tomatoes as possible. Apparently Lycopene is very good for cancer patients and Oxheart has the highest quantity of this. I read about this research in the Tree Croppers magazine. I will have to eat half of my tomatoes cooked and the other half raw to cover all bases.
Katherine
Hi
Try making fermented tomato sauce with your Oxheart tomatos this will let you get the best out of them.
Angie

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