I had my first go at grafting this spring. My cherry tree had sprouted some suckers coming from a root and I had heaped earth around them and they had successfully developed their own roots, I potted these up in early August and kept them on my deck which is the warmest spot in my garden. When they began to sprout leaves in early September I got out my propagating book but found its grafting section didn't answer all the questions I had. I gave it a go any way and am now waiting to see the results. I cut some twigs from the same cherry as I figured they must be compatible and grafted in an apical wedge, same as this link I have just found (Cherry wood is obviously a lot harder than Mango). I have decided also to get a proper grafting knife after looking at a few web sites after my go at grafting as I did find the cutting nearly impossible. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-EwtyO16dFg

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HI Isabell, I tried a plum graft one year but It wasn't successful, the plum trees that were here when we moved in do not bear any fruit at all, even though they blossom but I think they would be good root stock. I seem to always forget to do it when the twigs are dormant. I wonder what is the best way to secure the graft, it needs to be weatherproof doesn't it?
I was reading a book about growing tomatoes recently and it showed how to simply do a grafted tomato so I am waiting for my seedlings to be big enough to try it, I will use a vigorous cherry tomato for the root stock, and guernsay island for the tasty graft.
I would reccommend a fixed bladed stanley knife for general grafting work - the blade is very sharp and dosen't wobble! Most temperate wood is much harder than tropical fruit trees. Hte video is very good - though professiionals do make cutting perfect wdges look very easy (Soft wood also helps).
I would buy some grafting tape from a horticultural supply store if you are thinking of doing more grafting, modern tape is very stretchy and self locking and should be impregnated with anti fungal agents to lower the risk of diseases getting into the wound. The tape also helps stabilise the join as cleft (wedge) grafts are weak and take many months to strenghten up.
Derek
thanks for this advice, I will be getting the grafting tape and stanly knife for next year.

Derek & Julie Craig said:
I would reccommend a fixed bladed stanley knife for general grafting work - the blade is very sharp and dosen't wobble! Most temperate wood is much harder than tropical fruit trees. Hte video is very good - though professiionals do make cutting perfect wdges look very easy (Soft wood also helps).
I would buy some grafting tape from a horticultural supply store if you are thinking of doing more grafting, modern tape is very stretchy and self locking and should be impregnated with anti fungal agents to lower the risk of diseases getting into the wound. The tape also helps stabilise the join as cleft (wedge) grafts are weak and take many months to strenghten up.
Derek
My first go at grafting was not a success but I am undaunted I found the information in the book by geoff bryant left me with more questions than answers. however I found an old book at the op shop and have identified some crucial mistakes so am ready to give it a go next year. mainly I should have made my root stock and grafted in piece shorter. On to cuttings am trying feijoa, gooseberry, and soon cranberry and blueberry
Hi Isabell - I'd be very interested to hear how you get on with your cuttings. I've not had much luck with feijoa and would also love to try berries, if I can get my hands on some cuttings!

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